Message from the President

Steven Wishner

The Technion is achieving well-deserved global recognition for the excellence of its faculty, the quality of its diverse student body, and the cutting-edge technologies that its world-class research has fostered. From its multiple campuses around the world, spanning from Israel to New York to China, the Technion is not only developing technologies that protect and defend Israel, but its medical,

ATS – Boston Leadership Council President, Steven Wishner.

scientific, and technological research has also led to numerous scientific breakthroughs that have and will continue to benefit all humankind.

These benefits transcend religions, generations, geographies, and ethnicities, thus the global village is a better place because of the Technion. I am thrilled to have the opportunity to lead the American Technion Society – New England at this very exciting time. In New England, we are fortunate to have an active and meaningful base of alumni and donors who care deeply about the Technion and who have been very generous with their time and resources to help ensure the quality of education at the Technion, now and for future generations. I invite all to attend our interesting and exciting events, and to join us in helping to support the Technion and the extraordinary impact it has on us all.


Virtual Events

Join us virtually! We host New England regional events, as well as ATS National webinars featuring Technion faculty, alumni, and more.
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Keeping Israel On Top

Expansion of Technion’s Faculty of Computer Science

The Israel Innovation Authority now is projecting a deficit of qualified tech workers in the coming decade. In response, Israel’s Council for Higher Education has directed the State’s educational institutions to expand its computer science expertise and the number of graduates — and the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology has taken up the challenge.
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History of ATS – New England

The Technion has often been referred to as the MIT of Israel. That comparison is particularly apt when considering the origins of ATS-New England.

The Chapter got its start at the Boston Stein Club of MIT when a group of MIT alumni and other community leaders would meet there in the 1960s. From those friendships, ATS New England was born, and spawned generations of Technion supporters.

In the 1980s, ATS staffer Madelyn Bell Berman and volunteer Ed Goldberg teamed up to lead the chapter, focusing on attracting new members. Many of those early volunteers are still active today, including several Technion Guardians, a designation reserved for those who support the Technion at the highest levels. Mr. Goldberg went on to lead the New England Chapter and become ATS National President.

ATS-New England introduced the concept of Missions to Israel, picked up by then ATS Executive Vice President Melvyn Bloom. And the Chapter is responsible for many of the structures that dot the Haifa campus today. William and Cynthia Marcus launched the New England Region Center for Pre-University Education, later supported by Michael and Linda Frieze. Scott and Isabelle Black established a wing of the Lidow Physics building. George and Beatrice Sherman helped relocate the early Faculty of Education in Science and Technology to its permanent building.

To date, ATS-New England has raised more than $100 million for the Technion.

Professor Shai Shen-Orr with a student looking at a laptop in a Technion lab.

Technion Fund

The Technion is contributing to Israel and the global good in unprecedented ways, and it depends on people like you to ensure its continued advancement as a world-class institution of higher education.

The Technion Fund will help ensure that our supporters have access to a broad array of opportunities for engagement at all levels. The Fund will support the entire ecosystem necessary to maintain the Technion’s distinctive strengths.

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Technion Impact

Technion physicists led by President Uri Sivan and Distinguished Professor Moti Segev conducted an experiment to see how light behaves around curves. They froze a soap bubble so that it wouldn’t explode. Then they shined a light through the bubble. The scientists got their answer — as well as an unexpected breakthrough, featured on the July 2, 2020 cover of Nature.

Technion physicists led by President Uri Sivan and Distinguished Professor Moti Segev conducted an experiment to see how light behaves around curves. They froze a soap bubble so that it wouldn’t explode. Then they shined a light through the bubble. The scientists got their answer — as well as an unexpected breakthrough, featured on the July 2, 2020 cover of Nature.

View team and images captured of the light flows below.

“This is an important discovery with far-reaching potential consequences,” said President Sivan, the Bertoldo Badler Chair in the Faculty of Physics, of the phenomenon known as “branched flow,” seen for the first time with light waves. The team, which includes Technion Ph.D. candidate Anatoly (Tolik) Patsyk and former postdoctoral fellow Miguel A. Bandres, now an assistant professor at the University of Central Florida, believes the discovery could be useful in medical diagnosis, bringing about a more pinpointed examination of blood vessels and veins. The breakthrough could also help scientists understand how light flows through space and time.

The team anticipated the random structure of the soap field would defocus the light. Instead, the light waves formed channels of enhanced intensity that continued to divide and propagate like the branches of a tree. After a year of additional experimentation, they realized they were witnessing the first demonstration of the branch flow of light. This unusual form of light scattering was discovered in 2001 under observation through an electron microscope. Scientists, however, could not get an actual view of the target because the electron microscope merely constructs an image of what is happening.

“You need to think as an explorer,” said Professor Segev. “If you don’t understand it, go and try to understand it because often it opens new horizons. This is the beauty of experimental science.” Prof. Segev is affiliated with both the physics and electrical engineering faculties at the Technion, as well as the Solid State Institute in the Faculty of Chemistry and the Technion Russell Berrie Institute.

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